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Stories

We’ll Start a New Country Up

From the time they were kids, they just couldn’t wait for something bigger than their small Alabama town.

Summer’s End

Every year, they gathered at the campground to feel the magic of the mountain fireflies that glowed in time with each other. Then, a harsh discovery broke the spell.

Harper Lee’s “Tired Old Town”

Visit little Monroeville, Alabama, the inspiration for the immortal “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Our Southern Reader’s Travelogue continues.

The Long Tail of Segregation

Sixty years ago, George Wallace said, “Segregation now.” Six years later, the Supreme Court said, “Integration now.” We’re still assessing the aftermath.

Old Granny Teaches Magic

A pair of poems from the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas

A “Completely White World”

When integration came, her parents sent her to a whites-only private school. For four years, she’s collected the stories of students from that era. This is what she’s learned.

This Land Was Made for You and Me

Salvation South regulars Doug Cumming and Adam Smith introduce us to Frank Hamilton, who for many decades has ridden the rails of American folk music in fine company.

The Interview

There was a time in Hudson, North Carolina, when a man would never walk into a beauty shop. But one day, in 1973, one did.

He Chooses to Remember

Thoughts on reverie, restlessness, and recklessness from the poet laureate of West Virginia.

On the Rails of the Mystery Train

He’s almost 90, and he teaches music in a little school in Georgia. He’s also an unsung giant of American folk music who played with Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger. Meet Frank Hamilton.

Made You Look

The award-winning North Carolina writer David Joy’s new novel forces White characters into difficult conversations about race—and White readers to look harder at themselves.

The Threads, Both Light and Dark, of Life in Appalachia

A review of “Those We Thought We Knew,” the fifth novel by David Joy

How to Save the Summer

When you’re putting up the bounty of the garden, it’s positively lyrical.