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Stories

Young and Queer and Mountaineer

Mesha Maren’s third novel, out this week, is a landmark achievement for a new generation of Appalachian writers who assert their right to be fully queer and fully mountaineer.

Maud Newton’s Ancestor Trouble

Maud Newton’s upcoming book, “Ancestor Trouble,” explores the problems of family, how we define who we are, and how to truly reckon with our pasts.

“Charlie, Y’all Come Home”

Charles McNair and his siblings cared for their mother in her home as she neared death. Her memories had faded, but the lessons she taught them grew stronger.

Good Mountain People

Many lessons about the values of a South we want to live in come from Marianne Leek’s recent story.

The Tennessee Floods (Villanelle)

Poet Mel Buckingham from Nashville sets her memories of the 2010 Cumberland River floods to the strict rhyme scheme of the villanelle.

Hope Is a Place

Marianne Leek went to interview 87-year-old David Burch in North Carolina. She thought it would last an hour. But it lasted all day. And she learned a lot of lessons about hope.

We’ll See You on January 7!

All of us at Salvation South look forward to spending our first full year with you in 2022.

Mama’s Pimento Cheese Goes to College

Beloved newswoman Kay Powell tells us how her mama’s pimento cheese wound up being the subject of a sociology class in Colorado. (Recipe included.)

Seeds for Marvin

Compelled by a family tragedy, Frankie Roberts started LINC to provide hope, skills and community for men and women coming out of prison and addiction.

The Crossing

The Appalachian mountains are full of women who “become everybody’s mother.” This poem from Marianne Leek pays Christmas homage to one of them.

A Little House of Hope

To get through times like these, we’ve got to build our own little houses of hope and then live in them.

That Wasn’t for Me

Erik Peters brings us a small piece of fiction about a small gesture — and how such gestures can mean so much.

The History of St. Nick

Their mother was honest with her children. If only her children hadn’t been honest with their classmates.